The Rio Negro Sketchbook

Who says art and science are entirely separate disciplines? We care about what we see — and the more closely we observe, the more we understand. And there’s no better way of  observing closely than through creating art. And what we create, we care for. So any scientific endeavour involving conservation, species diversity or habitat   …Continue Reading

Jaguar by Laura House

Amazonia unites art, education and conservation.

Science for Brazil is celebrating three years of editorial operations, and during this time we’ve described every aspect of Brazil-related scientific endeavour – except our own. Now it’s time to tell you what we ourselves are actively doing to help protect Brazil’s astonishing biodiversity and help everyone to better understand its rich yet fragile Amazon   …Continue Reading

GSK invests in pharma research

UK based pharmaceutical giant is investing in Brazil’s basic research and sustainable chemistry sector, as a means of fostering the nation’s drug innovation process. This will be executed through studies of respiratory and metabolic diseases in the fields of immunology and inflammation – all in pursuit of antibacterial-antiviral treatments The São Paulo State Research Foundation   …Continue Reading

Biotech: Brazil’s big high-tech industrial hope

Brazil is now targeting investment in Biopharma and Biotech industries specialising both in human health for the tropics, and plant and animal husbandry for tropical agribusiness. In a world dominated by northern hemisphere drug companies focusing on the health needs of higher-income nations, these two sectors constitute a less competitive arena for Brazil to attempt   …Continue Reading

Silver Lining to Brazil’s Mining Pollution Cloud

For a nation that’s justifiably proud of hosting 20% of the world’s biodiversity, Brazil is coming to terms with a man-made environmental disaster that has all but eradicated biodiversity along the valley of the Rio Doce, a river flowing 500km from the heartland state of Minas Gerais to the Atlantic seaboard. The baroque, colonial era   …Continue Reading

If scientists can  predict and discover the Higgs Boson,  could they help organise politics too?

Order and Progress

Essay Scientists are angry with Brasilia’s federal government. So is much of society. Fear,  anxiety and frustration are the daily companions of tens of millions. Cynicism and disengagement are commonplace among ordinary Brazilians. No matter how you look at it, the slow-motion breakdown of Brazil’s system of democratic governance shows its politicians are in urgent   …Continue Reading

Economic Crisis in Science

“Brazilian science paralysed by economic slump,” warns Nature The influential science publication Nature has laid bare the abrupt reversal being experienced by scientists in Brazil, where for a decade booming funding allocations and growing prestige for federal and state agencies had generated unsustainable optimism. Now in a stunning reversal and just months after leftist president   …Continue Reading

‘Party’s Over,’ Warns New Science Chief.

Newly-impoverished Brazil could soon be reaching for higher impact science to guarantee a better “bang for every research buck,” after wasteful years and policymaking divisions between rival agencies. The “party’s over” message being delivered to Brazilian academics is that if they want access to fast-dwindling public resources, they must engage much more closely with the   …Continue Reading

Developing Countries and the Climate Change Convention

In the runup to December’s COP21 climate change talks in Paris, Brazil’s best-known scientist has issued a powerful challenge to the developing world’s most polluting nations to get behind the initiative, and to abandon decades-old rhetoric that blames rich countries for what has long been a shared global responsibility. Professor José Goldemberg, a veteran nuclear   …Continue Reading

Bumblebees Fight Agrochemicals

Brazil’s bumble bees are learning how to become Roundup-Ready, so anticipating the day when agrochemicals penetrate every corner of their natural world. Herbicides like Monsanto’s Roundup do not, of course, specifically target insects. But even quite low doses of the chemical – which in Brazil is widely used in conjunction with genetically modified crops such   …Continue Reading

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Researching in Brazil

Brazil’s best-known scientist, the veteran nuclear physicist  José Goldemberg,  in September 2015 took office as the president of  the São…

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